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I’ve been driving around a lot lately, and I’ve noticed a ton of birds around… I’ve mostly been admiring their flighty habits, silly songs, & peaceful beauty, but I’ve also been mindful of what pests they can be in our gardens.

Have you ever sown seeds in your garden, waited for seedlings to sprout, and came back only to find your garden sparsely producing? Birds, like the rest of us, have to eat. The different diets of our birdy friends can include insects, small animals, vegetables, & seeds.

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A loss of seedlings can be attributed to many different factors; but if you’ve noticed any birds hanging around, it’s possible that they could be robbing your garden long before the seeds have had a chance to mature. These beautifully pesky little creatures can also feed on the buds, flowers, and mature fruit in our gardens.

When allowed access to buds & flowers, birds have the ability to drastically reduce the amount of fruit produced; and that’s if they leave it at that! Sometimes these guys run in fruit eating packs, leaving no possibility of any fruit production behind.

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This quite aggravating behavior can happen at any point during your growing season, but it is often found that birds tend to harvest “The Day Before You Do”….Ughhhh! Really?? Don’t let the sun set on your garden, take steps towards preventing damage today!

So what can you do in order to prevent this damage from plaguing your garden?

  • Light-weight reusable plastic netting or wire mesh can be placed over your garden. The netting must be closed or close to the crop because these little buggers can get through gaps & openings.
  • Using transplants can reduce the numbers in production lost to seed theft.
  • Timing your harvest properly. If you’ve got mature fruit, harvest it and eat it as it becomes ready or store it for feasting at a later date.
  • Stakes with cloth strips/reflective material or flags placed every 15-20′ will deter birds from preying upon your garden. But this method’s effectiveness wanes after a few weeks as the birds tend to get used to it.
  • Chemical control is also possible, BUT this method IS NOT Recommended by Myra’s Garden.

Hope this was a helpful way of encouraging Garden Protection, while still being able to enjoy the beauty of God’s Creation.

Until Monday…

-XOXO,

Myra’s

 

Resources:
http://icwdm.org/Publications/pdf/Birds/blackbirdsveggiesRutgers.pdf